Discovery know with the new information they learn

Discovery
learning, which is considered a constructivist-based approach, is a form of
learning that does not take place through passive instruction or lectures but
from active hands-on participation in the learning process (Dewey, 1916/1997;
Piaget, 1954,1973). Students are encouraged to think, ask questions,
hypothesize, collaborate, and use what they know to reach their own conclusion.
The instructor serves as a facilitator who gives minimal guidance and provides
basic information. There are three major qualities for discovery learning
(Bicknell-Holmes & Hoffman ,2000). The first one is exploration and problem
solving, where the learner generates and acquires knowledge actively rather
than passively receiving lectures and drills. The students are encouraged to be
independent learners by thinking critically, creating, problem-solving, taking
risks, probing, seeking new information and discovering solutions. This shift
from a teacher centered classroom to a student-centered classroom is hard for
some teachers to adopt or accept (Hooks, 1994). A second characteristic of
discovery learning is that the activities are done according to the students’
pace and interest. The student learns at his own rate and sequence and is
therefore held accountable for his/her learning. And because it is based on
students’ interest, it promotes motivation for learning. In order for the students
to learn, the material must interesting and connected to the real world (Dewey,
1913). A third major
characteristic of discovery learning is that it relies on students’
prerequisites in order to build new knowledge (Bicknell-Holmes &
Hoffman, 2000). Learners correlate between what they already know with the new
information they learn to make sense and meaning to the material and to reach
their own conclusions. Roblyer,
Edwards, and Havriluk (1997) claimed that learning is best when students have
prior knowledge to build on, and when they discover information on their own.